Monthly Archives: August 2016

Is Fintech Right For You

We’ve already established how fintech is making a difference, which might leave you wondering whether you should add your talents to the effort.

If you are thinking about a career as a financial technologist, there’s good news: there’s a major fintech job boom underway. Consider London, for example, where experts are predicting that the sector will add more than 46,000 jobs in the decade between 2014 and 2024. The takeaway? If you’re looking for a job that combines security and financial payoffs, fintech is well positioned to offer both.

Fintech is also uniquely suited to Millennials — not just in terms of the fact that the products and services offered by fintech speak to their particular sensibilities, but also in terms of their role in driving the market. After all, Millennials are not only the first truly digital generation, but they also witnessed their parents bear the brunt of the financial collapse. It follows that, according to Fintech Week, “Many of the younger generation have completely lost faith in the banking world – and who are we to blame them? They need an alternative solution, and what they understand is technology and relentless innovation – a gap in the market which Fintech has now filled.”

For some younger people, meanwhile, the allure of fintech is also a very personal one: With student debt crippling the futures of many of today’s grads, fintech’s potential impact on the student loan refinancing market — both in terms of the creation of new products and serves as well as in prompting the banking industry to raise its own game in response– is particularly compelling. Imagine a future in which student loans are inherently affordable. Fintech may hold the key.

The best part? Not only is the fintech industry alive, well, and ripe with opportunities, but there are many ways to get in on the action. From formal business and finance studies to a foundation in engineering and technology, a multitude of avenues lead into this red-hot field — all with the potential to change your life, and maybe even the world, too.

Philosophers on World

Why is philosophy so important that UNESCO designated this discipline with its very own day?  UNESCO Director-General Irina Bokova explains, “Faced with the complexity of today’s world, philosophical reflection is above all a call to humility, to take a step back and engage in reasoned dialogue, to build together the solutions to challenges that are beyond our control. This is the best way to educate enlightened citizens, equipped to fight stupidity and prejudice. The greater the difficulties encountered the greater the need for philosophy to make sense of questions of peace and sustainable development.”

While we often think of philosophy as theoretical in nature, it not only has practical applications, but multidisciplinary ones.

Seven Influential Philosophers Across the Disciplines

Still think the musings of philosophers are more ethereal than earthly? Read on for a roundup of philosophers whose work directly shaped understanding in a particular field or area of study.

1. Michel Foucault

While largely regarded as a historian and philosopher, Foucault is also well known for his contributions the social sciences — particularly for his ideas about the link between knowledge, power and social control. His work has enlightening applications across a number of topics, ranging from socio-legal studies and the sociology of race to feminist and political theory.

 

2. Michel de Montaigne

While more of a statesman in his time, de Montaigne is now heralded as an author whose intellectually heady essay directly influenced writers from all over the world, including Descartes, Bacon, Pascal, Rousseau, Emerson, Nietzsche, Asimov and even Shakespeare. He’s also credited with the acceptance of the essay as a literary genre in its own right. His ideas about psychology — particularly as related to education, fear, motivation, happiness, and thought — also had a significant impact on psychology.

 

3. Saul Kripke

According to Encyclopaedia Britannica, this American logician and philosopher seminal publication, Naming and Necessity, forever altered analytical philosophy by providing “the first cogent account of necessity and possibility as metaphysical concepts” as well as in distinguishing “both concepts from the epistemological notions of a posteriori knowledge and a priori knowledge (knowledge acquired through experience and knowledge independent of experience, respectively) and from the linguistic notions of analytic truth and synthetic truth, or truth by virtue of meaning and truth by virtue of fact.”

Kripke’s work yielded fascinating new insights into language and linguistic meaning — particularly pertaining to common nouns and proper names.

Why you should to know about rusia learning

1. It’s home to a breadth and depth of prestigious universities.

As the world’s largest country, it’s hardly surprising that Russia is home to so many universities — 950 of them, to be exact. What may come as a surprise? How many of its higher education institutions offer world-class, globally-recognized educational opportunities. Russia now participates in the Bologna Process, and many of its premier universities are members of the European Universities Association.  A whopping 22 Russian universities, meanwhile, earned spots on the QS World University Rankings 2016-2017.

Russia recently earned a plum spot on Bloomberg’s roundup of the world’s most innovative economies, but its innovative spirit is not limited to the financial sector. A Russian education uniquely fuses traditional academic rigors with a commitment to innovation in the form of competency-based education across a breadth and depth of areas of study. And while we’d be lying if we didn’t say that studying in Russia was demanding, a degree from a Russian institution is highly prized by the world’s employers — making it well worth the effort.

There’s a reason why Russia’s best and brightest high school grads fight so fiercely for sought-after spots at the country’s universities. From engineering and economics to law and medicine, Russia offers near-endless opportunities for academic enrichment.

2. You can get a top-notch education for much less than you’d find elsewhere.

According to data provided by Study in Russia, the maximum cost of tuition at the country’s most elite universities tops out at 344,000 roubles annually — that’s $6,100 a year. Meanwhile, full-time bachelor’s degree programs start at just 63,000 roubles a year — or $1,100.

The only thing better than cheap tuition? Free tuition. The Russian government grants thousands of scholarships to international students every year. In 2016, for example, 15,000 scholarships were granted to international applicants covering full tuition, a maintenance allowance, and dormitory accommodations.

Lastly, university academic competitions also offer financial incentives to academic superstars.

And while Moscow may be expensive compared to other parts of Russia, the cost of living there is still significantly lower than it would be in spendier spots, such as the UK.

 

3. Innovation and research are alive, well and heavily prioritized in Russia.

While mention of the word Russia may initially bring to mind the austerity of a post-Cold War landscape, the country has come a very long way since then. Not only are many of its facilities state-of-the-art, but it also places a premium on international collaboration. If you’re looking for a truly global, cutting edge international study experience, it may well be waiting for you in Russia.

 

4. You can learn an in-demand language.

Not only is Russia currently a regional power, but it is returning as a world power. Because of its emerging status, everyone from the federal government to global corporations are looking for Russian language specialists.

Planning on a career in science or technology, meanwhile? Russian is also increasingly important in these fields — following only English in terms of number of academic publications in fields like mathematics, geology, physics, chemistry, and biology.

 

5. It’s an amazing place to live.

From its glorious architecture and fabled history to its vibrant culture and dazzling nightlife, there’s no end of things to see, do and discover in Russia. Lovers of the arts and sporting enthusiasts are equally likely to find plenty to love in Russia.

Celebrate Thanksgiving For Student

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning.

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town.

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge.

International Students in the US

1. They’re younger

A recent report published by the Institute of International Education (IIE) found that more international students who pursue higher education in the US come from US high schools. IIE’s Deputy Vice President for Research and Evaluation, Rajika Badhari says, “While secondary students from around the world have been coming to the United States on high school exchange programs for many years, IIE’s new analysis shows that the number of students who enroll directly in US schools to earn a US high school diploma now significantly outnumbers those who are here on exchanges.  This is a remarkable finding, and one which has implications for US higher education.”  What does this mean?  Students are coming to the US earlier and then following the direct pipeline from secondary school to higher education.

Even the ones who don’t study at US high schools before enrolling in a university program are historically younger.  International students are not just coming for graduate school anymore; they’re starting their university education in the US as undergraduates—and freshmen, more often than not

This uptick in younger international students on US campuses has forced many universities to strengthen their foreign-student services programs.  Younger international need the same academic, social, and emotional supports as domestic students, if not more so.  In addition to changing freshmen orientation to meet international needs, universities are addressing issues related language barriers, cultural and religious differences, and a new kind of homesick—typically from thousands of miles away, not to mention every college student’s need: time management skills.  Many universities started mentorship programs for international undergraduates in the US, pairing students with older international students, or even graduate students who typically have fewer emotional support needs, mostly because they’re older.

 

2. There are more of them

According to the Wall Street Journal, international students comprised nearly 5 percent of all undergraduate and graduate enrollment in the US in 2015, up from about 3 percent in 2005.   The 2015 Open Doors Report on International Education Exchange, an annual survey of study abroad trends published by the IIE in partnership with the US Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, confirmed that the number of international students at US universities experienced its highest growth rate in 35 years.  The IIE’s conclusion?  The US continues to be the destination of choice for international students.  According to the IIE 2015 Open Doors press release, IIE President Dr. Allan E. Goodman said, “International experience is one of the most important components of a 21st-century education.  Studying abroad is one of the best ways undergraduate and graduate students gain the international experience necessary to succeed in today’s global workforce.  And studying in another country prepares students to be real contributors to working across borders to address key issues in the world we share.”  Stay tuned for the 2016 Open Doors Report, to be released later this month.

 

3. Likely from Asia

51 percent of all international students who studied abroad in the US last year were from Asia. China contributed 31 percent of the total.  Of the 974, 926 students, 304,040 thousand hailed from China, 132,888 from India, and 63, 710 from South Korea. 20 percent of those students studied business and management, and another 20 percent study engineering.  Where are they going?  All over the country.  According to the 2015 IIE Open Doors Fast Facts, in 2015, the top five US institutions hosting the largest numbers of international students are: New York University, the University of Southern California, Columbia University, Arizona State University, and the University of Illinois—Urbana.

 

4. They pay their own way

As undergraduate numbers bulge, so do pocketbooks.  Many of the US’s international students—roughly 60 percent—report that their family covers their tuition.  A growing number also study on scholarships sponsored by their governments.  Studying in the US no longer means you have to be from a well-traveled, well-heeled elite class.  The surging middle classes from places like Shanghai and Seoul, Riyadh, Delhi, and Taipei now compete with their once elite classmates.